This primal beast

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did-you-kno:

In 2007, a married couple filed for divorce after they realized that they were cheating on one another in an online chatroom - with each other.
Source

did-you-kno:

In 2007, a married couple filed for divorce after they realized that they were cheating on one another in an online chatroom - with each other.

Source

sixpenceee:

THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT YOU WOULD HEAR IN CASE OF A NUCLEAR ATTACK 

Many countries have systems that allow them to speak to as many people as possible in case of something catastrophic. 

The United States has the Emergency Alert System. When triggered, the system interrupts all T.V and radio systems to speak. 

This is what it sounds like.

The most creepiest and terrifying noise and voices ever. 

Source: X

Dogs have a baculum bone? Huh. The more you know.

Anonymous

rickyhitler:

shadyufo:

oosik:

shadyufo:

That they do! A great deal of mammals have them with the exception of ungulates, cetaceans, marsupials and a few others. Humans don’t have them but great apes do.

And I recently learned that many female mammals have their own genital bones called baubellums or os clitoridis!

The more you know!

There’s a mnemonic for remembering which animals have bacula: 

PRICC

Primates - NHP (Adam used his to make Eve)
Rodentia - Rodents, though not rabbits
Insectivora - moles, shrews, hedgehogs
Carinvora - bears, cats, dogs, pinnipeds, raccoons, otters, weaseals, etc
Chioptera - bats

From the fabulous Mr. Oosik himself! This is super helpful but also very beautiful and hysterical.

LMAO! I love it. perfect

I was told bovines have one though? Is this true? I only heard of it because someone told me they give their dogs “bull penis bones” to chew on. 

The Radical Plan To Eliminate Earth's Predatory Species

willow-wanderings:

howtoskinatiger:

thegreenwolf:

This is like the crazy variant of veganism taken to evil mastermind levels. 

This is one of the weirdest things I’ve ever read.

Pro Tip: if your ideas of “conservation” sound like something a Disney villain would come up with, YOU’RE DOING IT WRONG.

Seriously this guy wants to literally destroy everything that makes the planetary ecosystem function, put a halt to evolution entirely (because of religious texts might I add)…. and has the nerve to call it a good thing.

Clearly, someone is not on the proper medication.

Oh shit balls. I’ve seen a person like this. Of course, they also based it off religion…

They believed we can make lions thrive on grain despite their biology and be among lambs and “guard the flocks”. They believed it would work because of the story of that one vegetarian lion back in the old days who would not eat meat or vomit it up. Which, by the way, she died real young (I think 4 or 5) because she got sick easily. 

(Source: evnw)

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

onegreenplanet:

The Truth About White Tigers and Why Their Breeding Needs to Stop

onegreenplanet:

The Truth About White Tigers and Why Their Breeding Needs to Stop

http://raw-fed-pets.tumblr.com/post/93293774986/i-found-a-work-trade-job-on-a-farm-so-i-could

raw-fed-pets:

I found a work/trade job on a farm, so I could provide the most fresh grassfed beef bones, organs and meat possible for my special needs Mastiff (epilepsy), and my Great Dane who loses her hair even on Acana or Orijen. Tyr has been seizure and medication free for over two years thanks to raw….

shadows-of-a-fallen-angel:

chiltonomics:

i-regret-nothing-ever:

gallifrey-feels:

china no

marvel yes

Dolphin what

Science why

(Source: iraffiruse)

Fifteen Native Tales about the Northern Lights

oosik:

We know today that the aurora borealis, commonly called the “northern lights” occurs when electrically charged particles from the sun zoom into Earth’s atmosphere. The phenomenon is most commonly witnessed during fall and winter months at high-latitude locales, including Alaska and northern Canada.  When you witness the lights streaking across the sky, reaching a height of up to 620 miles, surely you can understand how so many cultures came to develop mystical stories about them.
The aurora, with its striking colors and dance-like movements—seems otherworldly. The lights gave some communities feelings of comfort and happiness while others dreaded their re-appearance, considering them a bad omen.
Here are just 15 such tales:
1. When they witnessed the lights, many Inuit, the Arctic’s indigenous peoples, believed they were spirits of the dead playing a game with a walrus skull as the “ball.” The Inuit of Nunivak Island in the Bering Sea flipped its take on this story believing that it1. When they witnessed the lights, many Inuit, the Arctic’s indigenous peoples, believed they were spirits of the dead playing a game with a walrus skull as the “ball.” The Inuit of Nunivak Island in the Bering Sea flipped its take on this story believing that it was walrus spirits playing with a human skull.

2. Indigenous Greenlanders believed that the lights were dancing spirits of children who had died at birth.

3. For Wisconsin’s Fox Indians, the aurora gave them a sense of foreboding—representing their slain enemies preparing for revenge.

4. In Alaska, some Inuit groups saw the lights as the spirits of the animals they had hunted, namely beluga whales, seals, salmon and deer.

5. In Norse mythology, the lights were the spears, armor and helmets of the warrior women known as the Valkyries. They rode on horseback, leading fallen soldiers to their final resting place at Valhalla.

© Eric Rock

6. The Inuit of Hudson Bay dreaded the lights, believing they were the lanterns of demons pursuing lost souls.

7. In Finland, a mystical fox was thought to have created the aurora, its bushy tail spraying snow and throwing sparks into the sky.

8. Some Algonquin peoples believed their cultural hero, Nanahbozho, relocated to the far north after he finished creating the Earth. He lit large fires, which reflected back to his people in the form of the northern lights. This let them know he was thinking of them, even though they were far apart.

9. In perhaps the best oxymoron in British folklore, Scottish legend refers to the lights as “Merry Dancers” engaged in bloody battle.

10. Indians of the Great Plains of North America thought the light display came from northern tribes who were cooking their dead enemies in huge pots over blazing fires.

An inukshuk on Hudson Bay, Canada. Inukshuks are believed to have been used by native Arctic peoples for navigational purposes. © Brad Josephs/NHA

11. Inuit in Point Barrow, Alaska’s northernmost spot, believed the aurora was evil. They carried knives to protect themselves from it.

12. In Estonia, one legend said the lights appeared when whales were playing games. Another said they were sleighs taking guests to a spectacular wedding feast.

13. Wisconsin’s Menominee Indians saw the lights as torches used by benevolent giants used when they speared fish at night.

14. Fishermen in northern Sweden took the lights as a good prophecy, believing they were reflecting large schools of herring in nearby seas.

15. If you whistled at the aurora, some Native Americans believed it would sweep down and take you away. Clapping your hands, however, caused the lights to retreat, keeping you safe. Meanwhile, in northern Scandinavia, the Sami people hid indoors during the light show.